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All About Docks

Targus Docking Station Dictionary

Docking Station (Dock)

A device connected downstream from a host to support video, USB hub, and GbE input/output. In Targus vernacular a “dock” has an Ethernet port while a “dongle” will not.

Universal Docking Station

A downstream device connected to host port that can be connected to any USB Type-A/B/C data port.  Targus supports USB Type-C Power Delivery (PD) on many of its USB Type-C Universal Docking Stations; and power and charging for USB Type-A based docking stations using a universal power tip system, https://targusblog.com/2017/05/15/using-targus-dock71-and-dock77-power-tips/. The Targus USB Type A/B docks can be converted to USB Type-C, some with PD, https://targusblog.com/2017/05/31/targus-adds-aca44-type-c-adapter-for-usb-data-and-3-pin-power/. The USB Type-C native upstream docks can be converted to Type-A, with or without power, https://targusblog.com/2017/07/10/targus-dock180-usb-3-1-gen-1-with-usb-type-c-power-delivery-uds/. The DOCK190 supports a Type-A/B or C connection, USB Type-C PD or legacy power and charging.  Many OEMs use the term “Universal Docking Station” to describe a dock that works with many of their PC models, even if not all of them. Some OEMS may use the term “Universal Docking Station” even when the dock will not function across platforms. Targus Universal Docking stations can be used across models of a vendor, across vendors of a PC, and even across platforms including various versions of Windows, Chrome OS, macOS-X, Android, and Linux.

Host

The upstream PC, MacBook, Chromebook, Android Phone/Tablet, or Linux PC controlling the downstream docking station I/O.

Device

Usually used to described something connected downstream from the dock but can also be used to describe a host device.  Most devices require drivers.

Note, a Targus Docking Station is a device as opposed to a Port Replicator that is not although often referred to as a dock.

USB SuperSpeed (SS)

The most common, most universal, and most prolific of the current I/O ports found on computers. A USB port capable of a 5Gbps USB I/O data connection. It can be implemented in the traditional Type-A/B, mini/micro B, Type-C, or a proprietary method (i.e. lightning). USB 3.0 SS downstream facing ports can be used with USB 2.0 and 1.1 devices (i.e. a mouse).

USB 3.0

Most often used to describe a USB SuperSpeed 5Gbps Type-A port connection. See USB 3.1 Gen 1. It’s most often blue but does not have to be. Targus docking stations USB 3.0 ports support the minimum of 5VDC @ 900mA downstream facing power, some up to 5VDC @ 1.5A BC 1.2.

USB 3.1 Gen 1 SuperSpeed

The new name for USB 3.0. Most often used to describe a USB SuperSpeed 5Gbps Type-C port connection, with or without USB Type-C PD. Targus docking stations downstream USB 3.1 Gen 1 ports support the minimum specification of 5VDC @ 900mA downstream facing power, some to 5VDC @ 1.5A, and USB Type-C Thunderbolt are 5VDC at 3A source ports or Dual Role Ports (DRP) for power.

USB 3.1 Gen 2 SuperSpeed+

A USB SuperSpeed+ 10Gbps Type-C port connection, with or without USB Type-C Power Delivery.  It can enumerate at USB 3.1 Gen 1 SS and lower rates.

USB Type-C (USB-C)

The name of the reversable/flip-able connector (port and receptacle) used for USB Type-C connections. While almost always has at least USB SuperSpeed data, some USB Type-C ports are for PD only; some support Alternate Modes in addition to USB SuperSpeed. It is possible for a host and device to each be compliant with the USB Type-C specification, but not be compatible for data or PD. It is also important to pay attention to the cable being used for USB Type-C connections. Some do not support the desired data or power functionality.

USB Type-C DisplayPort Alternate Mode (DP Alt. Mode)

The DisplayPort Alternate Mode of the USB Type-C specification, with or without USB Type-C Power Delivery, that contains at least USB SuperSpeed data and 2-4 lanes of DisplayPort 1.3 video. See https://targusblog.com/2017/09/20/displayport-alternate-mode-vs-dp-alt-mode/. Many vendors state “USB-C” or just “Type-C” when meaning “USB Type-C DisplayPort Alternate Mode”. Targus USB Type-C DP Alt. Mode docking stations are the DOCK410 with PD to 60W, https://targusblog.com/2016/12/20/optimizing-your-targus-dock410-experience/, the DOCK411, and the newer DOCK412 with PD Pass-Through, https://targusblog.com/2018/03/21/targus-dock412-dp-alt-mode-travel-dock-with-pd-pass-through/. PC with DP Alt. Mode or Thunderbolt ports usually support Multi-Stream Transport (MST); newer MacBooks do not.  DP Alt. Mode is NOT universal.

Thunderbolt aka Thunderbolt 3 USB Type-C

The Thunderbolt Alternate Mode of the USB Type-C specification at 40Gbps, with or without USB Type-C PD, that contains USB SuperSpeed (sometimes USB SuperSpeed+) data; a single (often dual) 4-lane DisplayPort 1.2 video data (sometimes with MST), and PCIe capabilities. See https://targusblog.com/2017/12/21/targus-dock220-usb-type-c-thunderbolt-3-docking-station-with-power-delivery/. Thunderbolt is the highest performance of current prolific cable interfaces however it is relatively costly, higher in power consumption, and not universal when compared to USB SuperSpeedThunderbolt implementations often vary across platform and from vendor model to model.

USB Type-C Power Delivery Port (USB Type-C PD or PD)

A USB Type-C port that supports USB Type-C Power Delivery (PD), sink (taking), source (giving) or Dual Role Port (DRP) that can sink or source power. Targus often abbreviates the ability of a port to establish a USB Type-C Power Delivery Contract as able to “PD”. It is important that a PD ports’ voltage and current is compatible. Most of Targus upstream facing PD ports can source 5, 9, 12, 15, and 20 VDC @ 3A (DOCK180, DOCK410) and as much as 5A (DOCK190).

USB Type-C Power Delivery Pass-Through (PD Pass Through)

An ability of a USB Type-C port to pass through power supplied to it. Careful attention should be made to 1) the PD contract available by the source and 2) the power consumed by the Pass-Through device itself.

Legacy or Barrel Power and Charging

Used to describe the barrel (sometimes rectangular) tip used for power source to the power input on a PC or Chromebook using 19.5VDC in. Targus docks with legacy power support up to 90W of power to the host.

DisplayPort

Both the name of a physical port plug/receptacle and the name of the audio/video data protocol most often running on it. Primarily used on display monitors. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DisplayPort and DP Alt. Mode. Most Targus docking stations support DP1.2++, the DOCK220 DP1.2, and the DOCK410 DP1.3. Be sure to use a DP cable that supports the intended DP version, it’s recommended to use the cable that came with a monitor.

HDMI

Both the name of a physical port plug/receptacle and the name of the audio/video data protocol most often running on it. Primarily used with consumer video devices, TVs, and projectors. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HDMI. Most Targus docking stations support HDMI 1.2 and newer models HDMI 2.0 audio/video for higher resolutions. Be sure to use an HDMI cable that supports the intended HDMI version, its recommended to use the cable that came with a monitor. Targus HDMI ports can be converted to DVI-D ports. There is a USB Type-C HDMI Alt. Mode.

MHL

See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mobile_High-Definition_Link.

DVI-D/I

See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Visual_Interface. Older model Targus UDS support DVI-I and newer ones DVI-D. DVI-I ports also support DVI-D. The Targus dock DVI-I ports can be converted to VGA, DVI-D ports cannot.

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